Vietnamese Stuffed Pancakes

I am a big fan of Vietnamese food and I have been fortunate enough to sample quiet a bit of it while I was living in Dallas. There were a couple of great restaurants in areas where I used to work so it was pretty easy for me to bounce into a place, get a nice clay pot of food, or sample really authentic cha gio, pho, or things such as bánh xèo, otherwise known as “sizzling cake”. I am also a big fan of creating new things and allowing my family to experience things that they would either never order off a menu, or probably never try in their lifetime.

Vietnamese Pancake Recipe

As my wife was a big fan of the Korean pancakes I made some time ago, I decided to make another spin off of those, but introducing her to a Vietnamese style, savory pancake, or crepe, if you will.

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of rice flour
  • 1 cup of all purpose flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 12 oz light beer
  • 13.5 oz of coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 cups of cold water
  • 3 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup cooked pork, chopped
  • 1 cooked shrimp, chopped
  • 1/4 cup of fresh bean sprouts
  • fresh cilantro
  • fresh mint leaves
  • Thai bird chile, optional
  • Romaine Lettuce leaves
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • Nuoc Cham, optional

I have listed the pork, shrimp, and bean sprouts in the quantity that will make one pancake, so prepare more if you are feeding a small army of people.

Start by mixing both flours, and salt. Add in the coconut milk, beer, and water. Whisk until you have a smooth batter. Toss in the green onions, stir, and set aside and let the mixture rest for at least 30 minutes, or even better, overnight, covered in the refrigerator.

Prepare all of your ingredients as these pancakes cook rather quickly.

How to make Vietnamese Pancakes

Heat a nonstick skillet on medium, to medium high heat for a minute or so. Add in the oil and swirl around. When you begin to smell the oil heating up, toss in the cooked pork and shrimp, just to warm them through.

Give the pancake mixture a good stir as things will have settled to the bottom of the bowl.

Ladle in enough of the mixture to lightly blanket the shrimp and pork. You are not going for a thick and dense pancake here. Add the bean sprouts to the top of the pancake.

Cover the skillet and cook the pancake for about three minutes. Uncover, and cook another 2-3 minutes.

Using a spatula, slide it under the pancake, sliding it around the edges, and carefully fold.

How to make Vietnamese Pancakes recipe

Place on a serving dish, and garnish with fresh mint, cilantro, lettuce leafs, and the Thai chile.

Take a bit of the pancake, place it inside the lettuce leaf, and top with the fresh herbs.  Drizzle some of the nuoc cham on the top and dig in.

This Vietnamese savory pancake is a thing of beauty. Nice and crisp on the exterior, and soft and velvety on the interior. That along with the shrimp and pork, with the crunch from the bean sprouts, well, I think you just found your new best friend.  Hope you enjoy.

Vietnamese Stuffed Pancakes
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2
 
Ingredients
  • 2 cups of rice flour
  • 1 cup of all purpose flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 12 oz light beer
  • 13.5 oz of coconut milk
  • 1½ cups of cold water
  • 3 green onions, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup cooked pork, chopped
  • 1 cooked shrimp, chopped
  • ¼ cup of fresh bean sprouts
  • fresh cilantro
  • fresh mint leaves
  • Thai bird chile, optional
  • Romaine Lettuce leaves
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • Nuoc Cham, optional
Instructions
  1. I have listed the pork, shrimp, and bean sprouts in the quantity that will make one pancake, so prepare more if you are feeding a small army of people.
  2. Start by mixing both flours, and salt. Add in the coconut milk, beer, and water. Whisk until you have a smooth batter. Toss in the green onions, stir, and set aside and let the mixture rest for at least 30 minutes, or even better, overnight, covered in the refrigerator.
  3. Prepare all of your ingredients as these pancakes cook rather quickly.
  4. Heat a nonstick skillet on medium, to medium high heat for a minute or so. Add in the oil and swirl around. When you begin to smell the oil heating up, toss in the cooked pork and shrimp, just to warm them through.
  5. Give the pancake mixture a good stir as things will have settled to the bottom of the bowl.
  6. Ladle in enough of the mixture to lightly blanket the shrimp and pork. You are not going for a thick and dense pancake here. Add the bean sprouts to the top of the pancake.
  7. Cover the skillet and cook the pancake for about three minutes. Uncover, and cook another 2-3 minutes.
  8. Using a spatula, slide it under the pancake, sliding it around the edges, and carefully fold.
  9. Place on a serving dish, and garnish with fresh mint, cilantro, lettuce leafs, and the Thai chile.
  10. Take a bit of the pancake, place it inside the lettuce leaf, and top with the fresh herbs. Drizzle some of the nuoc cham on the top and dig in.
  11. This Vietnamese savory pancake is a thing of beauty. Nice and crisp on the exterior, and soft and velvety on the interior. That along with the shrimp and pork, with the crunch from the bean sprouts, well, I think you just found your new best friend. Hope you enjoy.

 

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Dax Phillips

Thank you for visiting my website. Truly, I do appreciate it. My free time and stress reliever is cooking for my family, friends, and everyone in between. The recipes you find on this site are those that I have either created, been part of, or those that I simply enjoy and have made my own in some shape, form, or other. My focus has always been on comfort food, because at the end of a long work day, you want something comforting. I currently am the father of three children, and married to a wonderful wife of thirteen years. There is nothing fancy with these recipes, just simple, and I will admit, not so simple ingredients, and a simple kitchen corner I can call my own. I learned early on that cooking and bringing family together was very important. After all, this notion of being together at dinner time was instilled early on by my parents. There are many memories of being in the kitchen with my parents, watching them cook, or preparing meals, or those home cooked smells while waiting for dinner. My parents who worked full-time, always had home cooked meals during the week, with the exception of Friday nights where we would enjoy a Wisconsin fish fry, and often on late afternoons on Sunday, where we would order Ann's pizza. I tend to cook by making things up. As a home cook, I think you have to take chances, and add or subtract ingredients that make up a dish, and make them your own. Remember to taste, and taste often. If a dish has potential, try it again, and make it your own. You should also note that I do not count calories, or break down recipes into grams of anything. To me, that's a bit boring. My philosophy is that if the food is good, eat it, and eat it in moderation. Life is just too short not to enjoy good food. Commonly Asked Questions: Can I use your photography/content on my website/blog? Please do not redistribute my photography or recipes without my permission. All of the recipes and photography on this website are my own unless noted, and is subjected to copyright  If you’d like to use a photograph or a recipe, please contact me for permission. Will you review my product/book/site? I am available for recipe development, food photography and/or styling, travel/press events, product reviews, brand promotion/ambassador, and sponsored posts. If you are interested in working with me, or if you have a question/comment regarding a recipe or about my blog, please send me an email.

2 thoughts on “Vietnamese Stuffed Pancakes

  1. My Vietnamese parents and their parents make this quite a bit. But they always add something into the batter than turns it a yellow-ish color. Turmeric, maybe? I know you can buy pre-measured bags with the rice flour and the yellow powder with it. That’s what they use.

    1. Hi Kelly, thanks for stopping by the site and commenting. You are correct that the orange color is from tumeric. I left it out as I did not have any on hand and in my opinion, it doesn’t take anything away other than the color. I’ve never seen the measured bags, but what a great idea as that would save a few minutes in preparation.

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