Khao Poon

I’m certain I have said this before, but not only am I a huge fan of Thai food, but a few dishes in particular. Khao poon is being one of them. I will always say do not get intimidated by the ingredients, or any techniques for that matter, because once you are stocked up on some of the essential ingredients, they can go a very long way. I know my wife is always on my case when she opens the refrigerator and notices all of the bottles of soy sauces, sesame oils, fish sauces, oyster sauce, palm sugar, and so much more, but at the end of the week, this is stuff I am using on a regular basis, so yeah, I love cooking Thai food.

Khao poon is essentially a noodle soup made with whatever protein you desire, whether it may be chicken, fish, or pork, with an awesome coconut broth that I could drink throughout the day. This type of dish is also one of my favorites. Sure, I could eat laap and sticky rice everyday as well, but dishes like khao poon, khao soi, or laksa are really right up my alley when it comes to Thai comfort food.

Khao Poon Recipe

This noodle soup will have you wanting more and more, and feel free to experiment with chicken or pork as well.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound vermicelli noodles, cooked al dente, rinsed in colder water, drained
  • 1 tsp oil
  • 4 tbsp red curry paste, add more if you like it spicier
  • 28 oz unsweetened coconut milk
  • 14 oz water or chicken stock
  • 3 tilapia fillets
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • green cabbage, shredded
  • 1 whole lime, cut into wedges
  • 14 oz bamboo shoots, drained, rinsed
  • 1/2 bunch fresh cilantro
  • 1/2 cup of bean sprouts, per bowl
  • Thai chili, thinly sliced, optional
  • salt, to taste

Start by cooking your vermicelli and set aside as noted above.

During this time, make your broth. Add the oil to a medium sized pot, and bring to medium heat.  Toss in the red curry paste, give a good stir, and cook for a couple of minutes. Add in the coconut milk, stock, fish sauce, and fish. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat, and simmer for about 30 minutes. Add in the bamboo shoots, and give a good stir.  During this time, get ready to prepare your soup bowls.

How to make Khao Poon

To your soup bowl, add a bundle or two of vermicelli noodles. Add about a half a cup of shredded cabbage, about a quarter cup of fresh cilantro, a squeeze of lime, the bean sprouts, and then ladle a generous amount of the broth. Top with sliced chilies if you prefer a bit more heat. Taste, and season with a pinch of salt if you think that is necessary.

Eat with a spoon and chopsticks if you can. The broth has this great creamy, spiciness to it that when it is bundled with the crunch of the cabbage, bean sprouts, and freshness from the cilantro, well, I need to say no more. Let’s just say, as I said from the beginning, this is one of my favorite Thai comfort dishes. I hope you enjoy.

Khao Poon
Author: 
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Thai
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pound vermicelli noodles, cooked al dente, rinsed in colder water, drained
  • 1 tsp oil
  • 4 tbsp red curry paste, add more if you like it spicier
  • 28 oz unsweetened coconut milk
  • 14 oz water or chicken stock
  • 3 tilapia fillets
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • green cabbage, shredded
  • 1 whole lime, cut into wedges
  • 14 oz bamboo shoots, drained, rinsed
  • ½ bunch fresh cilantro
  • Thai chili, thinly sliced, optional
  • salt, to taste
Instructions
  1. Start by cooking your vermicelli and set aside as noted above.
  2. During this time, make your broth. Add the oil to a medium sized pot, and bring to medium heat. Toss in the red curry paste, give a good stir, and cook for a couple of minutes. Add in the coconut milk, stock, fish sauce, and fish. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat, and simmer for about 30 minutes. Add in the bamboo shoots, and give a good stir. During this time, get ready to prepare your soup bowls.
  3. To your soup bowl, add a bundle or two of vermicelli noodles. Add about a half a cup of shredded cabbage, about a quarter cup of fresh cilantro, a squeeze of lime, and then ladle a generous amount of the broth. Top with sliced chilies if you prefer a bit more heat. Taste, and season with a pinch of salt if you think that is necessary.
  4. Eat with a spoon and chopsticks if you can. The broth has this great creamy, spiciness to it that when it is bundled with the crunch of the cabbage, bean sprouts, and freshness from the cilantro, well, I need to say no more. Let's just say, as I said from the beginning, this is one of my favorite Thai comfort dishes. I hope you enjoy.

 

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Dax Phillips

Thank you for visiting my website. Truly, I do appreciate it. My free time and stress reliever is cooking for my family, friends, and everyone in between. The recipes you find on this site are those that I have either created, been part of, or those that I simply enjoy and have made my own in some shape, form, or other. My focus has always been on comfort food, because at the end of a long work day, you want something comforting. I currently am the father of three children, and married to a wonderful wife of thirteen years. There is nothing fancy with these recipes, just simple, and I will admit, not so simple ingredients, and a simple kitchen corner I can call my own. I learned early on that cooking and bringing family together was very important. After all, this notion of being together at dinner time was instilled early on by my parents. There are many memories of being in the kitchen with my parents, watching them cook, or preparing meals, or those home cooked smells while waiting for dinner. My parents who worked full-time, always had home cooked meals during the week, with the exception of Friday nights where we would enjoy a Wisconsin fish fry, and often on late afternoons on Sunday, where we would order Ann's pizza. I tend to cook by making things up. As a home cook, I think you have to take chances, and add or subtract ingredients that make up a dish, and make them your own. Remember to taste, and taste often. If a dish has potential, try it again, and make it your own. You should also note that I do not count calories, or break down recipes into grams of anything. To me, that's a bit boring. My philosophy is that if the food is good, eat it, and eat it in moderation. Life is just too short not to enjoy good food. Commonly Asked Questions: Can I use your photography/content on my website/blog? Please do not redistribute my photography or recipes without my permission. All of the recipes and photography on this website are my own unless noted, and is subjected to copyright  If you’d like to use a photograph or a recipe, please contact me for permission. Will you review my product/book/site? I am available for recipe development, food photography and/or styling, travel/press events, product reviews, brand promotion/ambassador, and sponsored posts. If you are interested in working with me, or if you have a question/comment regarding a recipe or about my blog, please send me an email.

2 thoughts on “Khao Poon

  1. Thank you for sharing this recipe. My mom used to make this every few months and we were always excited when we could smell the brother simmering all over the house.

    There are a few things that I would like to suggest that my mom did differently that I feel really add to this dish. As far as ingredients you’re spot on except we add long beans (yard long beans) and mint with the condiments. The addition of the fish is to give meatiness and substance to an otherwise thin broth. She would take the fish back out after cooking, grind it, and then put it back in. For a more fragrant broth she added lemongrass stalks, kaffir lime leaves, and sliced galangal (don’t eat them obviously lol).

    One last note, it is trivial but this is a Lao dish not Thai. If you have a chance to try Lao food definitely take it. There are similarities between the two cultures and you might find you love the food as well. Cheers!

    1. Thanks for the great suggestions. I would normally put in some kaffir leaves, as I love the flavor, but I did not as I was out of stock, as well as that of the galangal. I’ll have to try it with the long beans next time. I normally use long beans in some of my som tam. I should have placed this as a Laos dish as well, but figured norther Thailand would be close enough! Thanks for stopping by and placing the nice comment. Peace.

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