Month: March 2014

Carne Asada Fries

Carne Asada Fries

Sometimes you just have a real craving for junk food, and if you are like me, that doesn’t equate to a bowl of potato chips. See, this past weekend I had this idea in my head that I wanted to make a batch of hand […]

Enchiladas Suizas

Enchiladas Suizas

There are many things I never order off the menu when dining out at a Mexican restaurant, and one of those is enchiladas. I have no idea why I don’t order them because I do love them, and everything about them for that matter. I’m […]

Rapini with Sauteed Garlic

Rapini with Sauteed Garlic

I’ve lately became a sucker when it comes to dark, leafy vegetables. I spent many years in my young adulthood avoiding things such as spinach, kale, collards, chard, and the like, however these past several years, I have really enjoyed eating them, whether I throw them in my juicer, or slowly cook them down and eat them by the forkful.  This past week  I was caught browsing the produce aisle where there were great organic root vegetables, bok choy, and then the rapini that caught my attention. I’m not sure why, but either rapini, or broccolini always catches my attention when I see it. The dark green leaves, along with the small broccoli style buds entices me every time, and this visit was no exception. I decided to bring the rapini home, and turn it into a great side dish to pair with some seared tuna.

Rapini with Sauteed Garlic

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch rapini, tough stems removed and discarded
  • 6-8 cloves of garlic, peeled, left whole
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • salt to taste

Start by cutting the rapini into 3 inch segments, or you can leave whole if you prefer. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

Add the rapini to the salted water, and cook for about two minutes. Remove and shock the rapini in ice cold water. Drain, and push out any excess water. Set to the side.

Rapini with Sauteed Garlic

Heat a large skillet on medium-low heat. Add the oil and garlic, and let the garlic slowly cook in the oil, to infuse the oil if you will.

After a few minutes, add the rapini, and gently toss in the oil. Season with a bit of salt, toss again, then serve hot.

The result is a perfect balance between the slight bitterness of the rapini, along with the nuttiness, and that great garlic oil. It’s a perfect side dish, and goes perfect with fish, or heck, even mix in some pasta and you will be in great shape. Hope you enjoy.

Rapini with Sauteed Garlic
Author: 
Recipe type: Sides
Cuisine: Italian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 1 bunch rapini, tough stems removed and discarded
  • 6-8 cloves of garlic, peeled, left whole
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • salt to taste
Instructions
  1. Start by cutting the rapini into 3 inch segments, or you can leave whole if you prefer. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
  2. Add the rapini to the salted water, and cook for about two minutes. Remove and shock the rapini in ice cold water. Drain, and push out any excess water. Set to the side.
  3. Heat a large skillet on medium-low heat. Add the oil and garlic, and let the garlic slowly cook in the oil, to infuse the oil if you will.
  4. After a few minutes, add the rapini, and gently toss in the oil. Season with a bit of salt, toss again, then serve hot.
  5. The result is a perfect balance between the slight bitterness of the rapini, along with the nuttiness, and that great garlic oil. It’s a perfect side dish, and goes perfect with fish, or heck, even mix in some pasta and you will be in great shape. Hope you enjoy.

 

Thai Cucumber Salad

Thai Cucumber Salad

It’s official, it’s spring time in the United States! For you warmer climate states, that probably doesn’t mean a whole lot to you, but to us Northerners, it means a great deal. It’s the first time we can see our yards, granted they are littered […]

Corned Beef Hash Quesadillas

Corned Beef Hash Quesadillas

This Monday was St. Patty’s day, a day that I have pretty much grown to love, primarily for the sale of corned beef. I’ve said it from time to time on this site that my wife is not a big fan at all of corned […]

Chinese Salted Eggs

Chinese Salted Eggs

It was not too long ago where I came across an article on Chinese salted duck eggs, and after reading it, I become very curious on the outcome of the eggs, so I decided to do my take on these Chinese salted eggs.

The eggs go way back and are much a common staple in China, however most use duck eggs. The common chicken egg can also be used, and in my case that is the direction I went.

Basically this recipe is eggs that are soaked in a brine and placed in the refrigerator for about 30 days or so, then cooked, typically hard boiled, and served with things like congee, however I simply fried mine in just a bit of unsalted butter. The result will amaze you.

Chinese Salted Eggs

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 6 whole eggs, chicken or duck eggs
  • 1 cup of salt
  • 4 cups of water, enough to fill your large non-reactive container
  • 2 tbsp black peppercorns
  • 1 star anise
  • 2 tbsp Shaoxing wine

Start by rinsing the eggs in cold water to remove any exterior filth.

Next add your salt, water, star anise, and peppercorns into a medium-sized pot, and bring to a boil to dissolve the salt. Once dissolved, remove from the stove, stir in the Shaoxing wine, and let it come to room temperature.

Next, the gentle part. Being careful not to crack the eggs, place them in a large mason jar. You want a glass jar that is non-reactive. Once the eggs are in place, pour the water into the jar, making sure you fully cover the eggs.

Cover the jar with the cap, and place in the refrigerator. Set your calendar, and check the eggs in 30 days.

Chinese Salted Eggs

When you are ready to make the eggs, either boil them to your favorite temperature, or fry them in a little bit of butter.

Now I will admit, I was a bit hesitant to try these as I did not know what I was getting myself into. I see folks buying these style of eggs at one of my Asian markets, and I knew that they were sitting in the brine so they would not go bad, so I went ahead and cracked one in a preheated skillet with a bit of butter.

I was blown away when I cracked it into the skillet. The whites were a bit thinner, and the yolk was this killer dark orange color. As I let this cook, I began spooning the melted butter on top of the yolk area to continue to cook.

When I took my first bite, I was pleasantly surprised. It was a bit salty, I’ll admit, but the texture was awesome. This would be a perfect pairing with some of the more bland dishes that need a punch of salt. Give these a shot. I hope you enjoy.