Search Results: lumpia

Jalapeno Stuffed Lumpia

Jalapeno Stuffed Lumpia

Gosh, I do love jalapeno poppers, don’t you? I love the actual surprise, not only with the piping hot cheese but the uncertainty if the jalapeno is going to be on the mild side, or the hot side. I prefer the hot side. With that…

Lumpia Shanghai Pizza

Lumpia Shanghai Pizza

A couple of weeks ago, my wife woke up on Saturday and said “I totally want some egg rolls today”.  Now many of you might not get overly excited about that, but I was actually pleased to hear that. I’ve had plenty of egg rolls…

Filipino Lumpia Shanghai

Filipino Lumpia Shanghai

Lumpia Shanghai RecipeWhen my wife and I starting seriously dating years ago, I would go back home and spend time with my family during the holidays. During my visits, I would spend time with her family as well. I recall them frying up lumpia, or at least this is what I referred to them as eggrolls, during the late evening hours when everyone played games around the table. I recall the game being tiles. Anyway, what struck me about these ‘eggrolls’, were that they were much more slender than the ones normally served at restaurants, and they were served with a simple spooning sauce of white vinegar, minced garlic, and black pepper. To this day, my in laws fry up these lumpia during family gatherings.

Commonly referred to in the Filipino culture as lumpia, or lumpiang prito (fried spring roll), my wife states that her favorite and somewhat traditional in her family, is a lumpia stuffed with ground pork, diced potato, green bean, and baby shrimp. As her recipe is really delicious (I prefer my take on them), I only make them about twice a year, just for her and her family if they stop by.

Ingredients: (Makes about 40 eggrolls)

  • 4 lbs Ground pork (I grind my own pork shoulder)
  • Uniform cut, fresh green beans
  • Uniform cut russet potatoes
  • Lots of fresh cracked pepper
  • salt to taste
  • 2 small bags of baby shrimp, thawed, and rinsed
  • Spring Roll wrappers
  • 2 eggs, beaten

Begin by cooking your pork in a large pot, until fully cooked. Drain the fat, add in the shrimp, mix, and let cool. In another large pot, boil the potatoes and green beans, until tender. These do not take long to cook down because they are a smaller dice, and uniform. Let the potatoes and beans cool a bit before you add them to the meat mixture. Once you add them to the meat mixture, season graciously with salt and pepper. Let this come to a complete cool before you begin wrapping.

Now, when you are ready to wrap, get your wrapping station ready. I used one large plate, a small bowl with the eggs, and a large baking sheet to let the lumpia set when you are done wrapping.

Take a spring roll wrapper, add about two large tablespoons of the mixture about a half inch from the end of the wrapper, and fold over, folding in the sides, brushing the other end with a bit of the egg wash, and fold over to seal.  Continue this process until you are done. The great thing about these, or the lumpia is that you can store them in the freezer, and simply drop them in a 350 degree pot of oil when you are ready. Fry until golden brown and serve with your lumpia sauce.

Lumpia Sauce:

  • 1/4 cup of white vinegar
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp fresh cracked pepper

Combine and serve with a spoon.

Sinamak – Filipino Spiced Vinegar

Sinamak – Filipino Spiced Vinegar

The idea of vinegar, and probably more so the idea of ‘acidity’ was never really something that I grew up with. I remember it (I think) being used sparingly with cooked brussel sprouts (something I did not like at all), and that is about it.…

Filipino Adobong Mani (Garlic Peanuts)

Filipino Adobong Mani (Garlic Peanuts)

My oldest son started college this year, and not too long ago he was on Spring break. We really did not have anything planned as everyone’s schedule was not matching up this year so he decided to stay home and rest. It was probably for…

Filipino Fried Bangus Breakfast (Daing na Bangus)

Filipino Fried Bangus Breakfast (Daing na Bangus)

I have always been curious when my Filipino relatives discuss food, whether things they are making at home, or things to try when travelling to the Philippines. It seems like I have only skimmed the top when it comes to making Filipino food. The common ones are lechon kawali, bicol express, kare kare, arroz caldo, lechon manok, paksiw lechon, lumpia shanghai, and their famous adobo.

The reality is that there is so much more, especially with their desserts which I have really yet to try. There have been several occasions when I have heard of a great breakfast, beyond a plate of garlic fried rice and tocino, and it inspired me because it is something similar to what I grew up eating when visiting my grandparents lake house, and that was fried fish with eggs. It was one of my favorites, and this one tops the list as well. A Filipino fried bangus breakfast.

Filipino Fried Bangus Recipe
Filipino Fried Bangus Recipe

The fish takes a bit of preparation but nothing out of the ordinary. A simple marinade, preferably overnight, along with the removal of any bones (you can do this beforehand, or cautiously pick them out as you dig at it after cooking).  The small amount of time pays off.  If you have never heard of bangus, don’t worry. The common name for it is Milkfish.  What is great about this is that it holds the flavor of the marinade, does not take very long to pan fry, and it is a great, white and firm meat. You can find bangus, most likely, in your local Asian market, and typically frozen.

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 4 filets of bangus, bones removed are optional
  • 1 cup of distilled white vinegar
  • 1 tbsp lightly crushed whole black peppercorns
  • 1 head of garlic, skins removed, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup canola oil
  • 1 cup of cooked jasmine rice, optional, per serving
  • 2 eggs, cooked to your liking, per serving
  • Thai bird chilies, optional

Start by marinating your fish. To a sealable plastic bag, or medium sized bowl, add the vinegar, garlic, black peppercorns, and salt and mix to combine.  Add the bangus (in my case they came portioned, most likely quartered). Give a good mix, seal or cover, and let everything marry overnight.

The following morning, remove the bangus, and place onto a plate. Pat both sides with paper towel and remove any peppercorns or garlic from the fish. Don’t worry if some stick on the fish. That’s extra flavor in my opinion!

Ingredients for making Filipino Bangus
Ingredients for making Filipino Bangus

Get a large skillet ready, and add in your oil. Bring this to a medium-high heat. After a few minutes of warming the oil, lay in the filets, skin side down, and cook for about 4 minutes or until the skin is nice and crispy. Once the skin is crispy, gently flip it over and cook an additional 4 minutes.

During this time, feel free to plate your cooked jasmine rice, cook your eggs, and plate that, and get ready to feast.

Once the fish is cooked, remove with a slotted spatula, preferably a fish spatula, and place on a paper towel lined plate to remove any excess oil. Remove the filets from the plate and onto your plate along with the rice and eggs, and dig in.

I loved this dish. Not only the flavor of the vinegar, garlic, and peppercorns but when that fish is mixed with the rice and eggs, well you have one heck of a breakfast! If you cannot find the bangus, feel free to try the marinade on another firm whitefish. Hope you enjoy!

Filipino Fried Bangus Breakfast (Daing na Bangus)
Author: 
Recipe type: Filipino
Cuisine: Asian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2
 
Ingredients
  • 4 filets of bangus, bones removed are optional
  • 1 cup of distilled white vinegar
  • 1 tbsp lightly crushed whole black peppercorns
  • 1 head of garlic, skins removed, roughly chopped
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 cup canola oil
  • 1 cup of cooked jasmine rice, optional, per serving
  • 2 eggs, cooked to your liking, per serving
  • Thai bird chilies, optional
Instructions
  1. The fish takes a bit of preparation but nothing out of the ordinary. A simple marinade, preferably overnight, along with the removal of any bones (you can do this beforehand, or cautiously pick them out as you dig at it after cooking).  The small amount of time pays off.  If you have never heard of bangus, don't worry. The common name for it is Milkfish.  What is great about this is that it holds the flavor of the marinade, does not take very long to pan fry, and it is a great, white and firm meat. You can find bangus, most likely, in your local Asian market, and typically frozen.
  2. Start by marinating your fish. To a sealable plastic bag, or medium sized bowl, add the vinegar, garlic, black peppercorns, and salt and mix to combine.  Add the bangus (in my case they came portioned, most likely quartered). Give a good mix, seal or cover, and let everything marry overnight.
  3. The following morning, remove the bangus, and place onto a plate. Pat both sides with paper towel and remove any peppercorns or garlic from the fish. Don't worry if some stick on the fish. That's extra flavor in my opinion!
  4. Get a large skillet ready, and add in your oil. Bring this to a medium-high heat. After a few minutes of warming the oil, lay in the filets, skin side down, and cook for about 4 minutes or until the skin is nice and crispy. Once the skin is crispy, gently flip it over and cook an additional 4 minutes.
  5. During this time, feel free to plate your cooked jasmine rice, cook your eggs, and plate that, and get ready to feast.
  6. Once the fish is cooked, remove with a slotted spatula, preferably a fish spatula, and place on a paper towel lined plate to remove any excess oil. Remove the filets from the plate and onto your plate along with the rice and eggs, and dig in.