Category Archives: Filipino

Lumpia Shanghai Pizza

A couple of weeks ago, my wife woke up on Saturday and said “I totally want some egg rolls today”.  Now many of you might not get overly excited about that, but I was actually pleased to hear that. I’ve had plenty of egg rolls in my time, however when I first met my wife, she turned me onto a whole different style of egg roll that she grew up with in the Filipino household. This style of egg roll is totally out of this world, but so pleasing to the taste. I decided to make nearly 30 Filipino lumpia shanghai, and I had some mixture left over to spare. I knew exactly what I was going to do with that mixture; make a pizza out of it.

Lumpia Shanghai Pizza

If you have never had lumpia before, it’s a must make, and it is especially awesome in a garlic and vinegar spooning/dipping sauce.

Let’s get started.

  • 1/2 lbs Ground pork (I grind my own pork shoulder)
  • 1/2 cups uniform cut, fresh green beans
  • 1/2 cups uniform cut russet potatoes, about 1/4 inch cubes
  • 1 1/2  tsp of fresh cracked pepper
  • 1/2  tsp salt, to taste
  • 1/2 cup baby shrimp, thawed, and rinsed
  • 1 batch of your favorite pizza dough
  • 1/2 cup pizza sauce
  • 1 1/2 cup fresh mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 1/2 cup plain corn chips, broken
  • light corn meal

Begin by mixing your pork in a large pot. Add in the green beans, potatoes, shrimp, and salt and pepper. Mix well.

Shape your pizza dough into about a 16 inch round.

If you are cooking in an oven, preheat a pizza stone for 30 minutes at 500 degrees.

How to make Lumpia Shanghai Pizza

Shower corn meal onto a pizza peel. Add the pizza dough, and reshape the pizza.

Spoon on the pizza sauce and slather it to lightly cover. Add on the cheese, then as if you were using uncooked Italian pork sausage, start taking tablespoons and adding dollops onto the top of the cheese.

Place in the oven for 20 minutes or until the pizza is cooked to your liking, but the pork cooked through.

I’ve been using my Kettle Pizza, so this pizza took about 6 minutes to cook in my grill. I highly recommend it.

Regardless, when the pizza is cooked, cut into slices, and shower with the corn chips for that crispy egg roll texture.

This pizza was everything awesome about having lumpia shanghai, but in pizza form. What’s not to love about that! What I should have done to make even better was to drizzle on some of that garlic and vinegar mixture. Next time. Next time… Hope you enjoy!

 

Filipino Adobo Pork Chops

I often think of making Filipino cuisine on a more regular basis, much like when I make Mexican food, or Thai for that matter.  The reality is that I have not been exposed to many of the diverse dishes that Filipino food offers. Now sure, I’ve rocked out many of the go to comfort dishes such as tinola, arroz caldo, lechon manok, crispy pork belly, giniling, and my wife and kids favorite, lumpia shanghai. As you can tell, I’ve done plenty, however this year, I want to be able to explore more cuisine and get some lessons from my father-n-law, who is from the best part of the culinary parts of the Philippines, the town known as Pampanga.  With all of this said, there is one go to dish that my wife, and kids always agree, and that is grilled pork chops. That’s right, it’s not Filipino (just yet), but if I were to ask my wife what she wanted for dinner, the default almost is always ‘pork chops and rice’. I’m down for that, and that’s why I turned the boring pork chop into something magical; the Filipino adobo pork chop.

Filipino Adobo Pork Chops

If you have never tried Filipino adobo, well, in my opinion it is a must. My wife grew up eating Adobo chicken, so you can pretty much use the basic marinade (which is amazing) and use it with probably any protein.

Let’s get started.

  • 5 pork chops, bone-in, medium cut
  • 1/2 cup dark soy sauce
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 tbsp Filipino vinegar, or white vinegar
  • 1 tbsp black peppercorns
  • 5 whole bay leaves, fresh or dried
  • Cooked rice

Combine all of your ingredients and place in a large, sealable bag. Seal, and swish everything around. Place in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours, or my preference, overnight.

You can bake these if you want, but I preferred to grill the pork chops just to get some smokey flavor introduced.

Pork Adobo Ingredients

When you are ready, heat your coals in your grill until they become nice and white.  During this time, remove the pork adobo from the refrigerator and let them come up almost to room temperature, or at least get some of the chill off of them.

Lightly oil the grill grate.

Add the pork chops to the grill, removing any peppercorns that might stick to them, if you desire, and cook until they are just a bit under temp, turning over along the way to get some nice grill marks. Once cooked to your liking, remove and place them onto a plate.

Let these rest a few minutes before serving.

Filipino Adobo Pork Chops

The result is awesome. Now generally you would stew this within the marinade, however not for this guy. The result is very similar to what you would get with the stewed version, but with just some great smokiness from the coals. It’s sweet, slightly sour, and slightly spicy. A winning combination in my book. Give these a shot if you are looking to explore a bit in your kitchen and outdoor grilling. Hope you enjoy!

Chinese Salted Eggs

It was not too long ago where I came across an article on Chinese salted duck eggs, and after reading it, I become very curious on the outcome of the eggs, so I decided to do my take on these Chinese salted eggs.

The eggs go way back and are much a common staple in China, however most use duck eggs. The common chicken egg can also be used, and in my case that is the direction I went.

Basically this recipe is eggs that are soaked in a brine and placed in the refrigerator for about 30 days or so, then cooked, typically hard boiled, and served with things like congee, however I simply fried mine in just a bit of unsalted butter. The result will amaze you.

Chinese Salted Eggs

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 6 whole eggs, chicken or duck eggs
  • 1 cup of salt
  • 4 cups of water, enough to fill your large non-reactive container
  • 2 tbsp black peppercorns
  • 1 star anise
  • 2 tbsp Shaoxing wine

Start by rinsing the eggs in cold water to remove any exterior filth.

Next add your salt, water, star anise, and peppercorns into a medium-sized pot, and bring to a boil to dissolve the salt. Once dissolved, remove from the stove, stir in the Shaoxing wine, and let it come to room temperature.

Next, the gentle part. Being careful not to crack the eggs, place them in a large mason jar. You want a glass jar that is non-reactive. Once the eggs are in place, pour the water into the jar, making sure you fully cover the eggs.

Cover the jar with the cap, and place in the refrigerator. Set your calendar, and check the eggs in 30 days.

Chinese Salted Eggs

When you are ready to make the eggs, either boil them to your favorite temperature, or fry them in a little bit of butter.

Now I will admit, I was a bit hesitant to try these as I did not know what I was getting myself into. I see folks buying these style of eggs at one of my Asian markets, and I knew that they were sitting in the brine so they would not go bad, so I went ahead and cracked one in a preheated skillet with a bit of butter.

I was blown away when I cracked it into the skillet. The whites were a bit thinner, and the yolk was this killer dark orange color. As I let this cook, I began spooning the melted butter on top of the yolk area to continue to cook.

When I took my first bite, I was pleasantly surprised. It was a bit salty, I’ll admit, but the texture was awesome. This would be a perfect pairing with some of the more bland dishes that need a punch of salt. Give these a shot. I hope you enjoy.

Slow Cooker Filipino Pork Adobo

Filipino food is underrated in my opinion. Granted, I’ve only skimmed the surface when it comes to eating legitimate Filipino food, but from what I have had, it is super tasty, well balanced, and extremely comforting. Everything from tinola, arroz caldo, mock sisig, torta, afritada, pancit canton, and bihon, plus who could forget lumpia, and the infamous pork barbecue.  Again, I am only skimming the surface, but there is one dish, in my opinion, that showcases the flavors of the Philippines, which results in sweet, sour, salty, and spicy, and that is adobo.

Adobo is basically the Filipino sauce and cooking process that typically consists of soy sauce, vinegar, garlic, meat, and onions that are slowly cooked in the sauce until it is super tender.  As I have made chicken adobo in the past, I wanted to try making a pork should, and cook it, while I was working, in a slow cooker. The results were nothing short of amazing.

Filipino Pork Adobo Recipe

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 3 lb pork shoulder, bone-in
  • 1 whole onion, thinly sliced
  • 6 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 inch of ginger, smashed
  • 1/4 white whine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 2 whole bay leaves
  • 1 tbsp cracked black pepper
  • 1 whole Thai chili, smashed
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • Your favorite Fried Rice

Add everything but the pork and fried rice to a mixing bowl. Give a good stir to dissolve the brown sugar.

Add the pork shoulder, fat side up to your slow cooker. Pour the mixture over the pork shoulder, cover, and cook for 7 hours.  After 7 hours, remove the pork shoulder and place onto a large cutting board.

filipino-pork-adobo-ingredients

Remove and discard the bone, and any additional fat. Cut the remaining pork into large cubes, then add the pork back into the slow cooker. Give a nice stir to cover with the sauce, garlic, and onions. Turn the slow cooker to high and continue cook for an additional hour before shredding with a couple of forks.

pork-adobo2

When you are ready to serve, plate the slow cooker Filipino pork adobo onto your plate, as well as a serving of your favorite fried rice. Garnish with an additional Thai chili pepper and some lemon wedges.

Your going to love this pork adobo. It is not only super tender and aromatic, but it has the most wonderful flavors. If you are looking to explore Filipino cuisine, start with this one. It’s not only easy, but it is super delicious. I served the leftovers as another serving, as well as wrapped up the pork adobo in warm, soft tortillas. I hope you enjoy.

Slow Cooker Filipino Pork Adobo
Author: 
Cuisine: Filipino
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8
 
Ingredients
  • 3 lb pork shoulder, bone-in
  • 1 whole onion, thinly sliced
  • 6 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • ½ inch of ginger, smashed
  • ¼ white whine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 2 whole bay leaves
  • 1 tbsp cracked black pepper
  • 1 whole Thai chili, smashed
  • ½ cup of water
  • Your favorite Fried Rice
Instructions
  1. Add everything but the pork and fried rice to a mixing bowl. Give a good stir to dissolve the brown sugar.
  2. Add the pork shoulder, fat side up to your slow cooker. Pour the mixture over the pork shoulder, cover, and cook for 7 hours. After 7 hours, remove the pork shoulder and place onto a large cutting board.
  3. Remove and discard the bone, and any additional fat. Cut the remaining pork into large cubes, then add the pork back into the slow cooker. Give a nice stir to cover with the sauce, garlic, and onions. Turn the slow cooker to high and continue cook for an additional hour before shredding with a couple of forks.
  4. When you are ready to serve, plate the slow cooker Filipino pork adobo onto your plate, as well as a serving of your favorite fried rice. Garnish with an additional Thai chili pepper and some lemon wedges.
  5. Your going to love this pork adobo. It is not only super tender and aromatic, but it has the most wonderful flavors. If you are looking to explore Filipino cuisine, start with this one. It’s not only easy, but it is super delicious. I hope you enjoy.