Smoked Meatloaf Sandwich

An old friend of mine recently sent me a picture, with words of excitement, of his smoked meatloaf. I always get excited about things like that, and it was funny that he sent it as it was on my list of things to make. With that said, I had recently updated my Weber kettle grill with the Smokenator 1000 (a product review will be posted in the near future). So as I was smoking a pork shoulder using this new accessory, I decided to whip up a quick meatloaf in a small pan, and smoke that as well, just to see how it would go. Holy moly, this friend was right. A perfect smoked flavor on what you know as a classic meatloaf, and one that was super tender and delicious. My wife and I had it for dinner this week, and just fell in love with it. She warmed it up and ate it as a classic meatloaf, and I decided to make a sandwich out of it, and let’s just say they were both phenomenal.

Smoked Meatloaf Sandwich Recipe

If you are busting out the smoker this week, give this one a shot. It was really great.

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb ground chuck
  • 3/4 cup of onion, diced
  • 1 carrot, shredded
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 slices white bread, crusts removed, diced
  • 1/2 cup of milk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp salt, to taste
  • 1 tsp cracked black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tbsp ketchup
  • aluminum pan to fit the meat loaf
  • buns, optional
  • BBQ sauce, optional

Start by soaking the bread in the milk, then get a large mixing bowl out and add in the remaining ingredients.

Once the bread is soaked, add the bread to the mixture, and then using your hands, combine to make sure all of the ingredients are nicely incorporated, but not overly mixed.

Add the meatloaf into your aluminum pan, and place into your preheated smoker (mine was stable at around 235 degrees). Cover, and let this smoke for about 2 hours, or until your internal temperature of the meatloaf is at around 165 degrees. Once that internal temperature has been met, carefully remove the pan (careful as it is hot, and there are plenty of juices. I use a couple of pair of tongs to do this.)

How to smoke a meatloaf

 

Once the meatloaf has slightly cooled, remove it from the pan, and cut it into slices.

Again, I made mine into a sandwich, and lightly seared it on a nonstick skillet for a few minutes. I then slathered some of my favorite barbecue sauce on the bottom bun, topped with the smoked meatloaf, and garnished it with a pickle.

The end result is nothing short of amazing, and I’m glad my old friend nudged me to move a bit quicker to make the smoked meatloaf. I used apple wood chips for the smoke, and it left just the right amount of smoke to make this not only a great meatloaf, but an awesome sandwich to boot. Hope you enjoy!

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Bacon Wrapped Fatty

I know the name of this recipe is pretty hilarious, but recently I joined an online barbecue forum, and everyone was talking about the ‘fatty’. I can see why they call it that, most likely due to all of the bacon, and pork, but trust me on this one, this thing is nothing but awesome. There are a few great things about making this, as one you get to make a bacon weave, lay out some great ground pork, and stuff the pork with whatever you have in mind, then roll it up, and place it on the smoker. I got really excited when making this, and the end result was something my entire family loved.

Bacon Wrapped Fatty Recipe

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 16 slices of bacon
  • 2 lbs Italian sausage, or ground pork
  • 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and diced
  • 3 small cremini mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 4 basil leaves, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups of shredded mozzarella cheese
  • pizza sauce
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • wax paper
  • gallon size sealable bag
  • smoker

Now let me start by saying you can stuff this however you want. I went more of an Italian style stuffing because I wanted to finish the bacon wrapped fatty with pizza sauce rather than barbecue sauce, but take the general layout here and make it your own.

Start by making your bacon weave. I will not go over those details, but it only takes a few minutes. There are many online instructions how to make one. One resource is this one, on YouTube.

Once the bacon weave is made, lay it on a large sheet of wax paper.  Next add the Italian sausage to a sealable plastic bag, and with a rolling pin, gently roll the sausage back and forth and side to side to level it out.

Once the pork is nice and even, using a scissors, cut along side the edges of the bag. Carefully flip it over and onto the second piece of wax paper.

How to make a bacon wrapped fatty

Add the mushrooms, garlic, onion, cheese, and jalapenos to the top, center of the flattened sausage. Carefully start rolling the pork mixture into a log using the wax paper as your guide. Once you have it in log form, using your hands, seal up the edges, then add the log onto the top of the bacon.

Repeat the process with the bacon. Now you have a bacon and pork log!

Place this onto your smoker. It’s going to smoke for a few hours. I smoked it on low for about 3 hours, then finished in the oven after lathering some pizza sauce onto it. You want the internal temperature of the pork to be about 165.

Smoked Fatty

When you are ready to serve, slice into rounds, and serve with any of your favorite sides.

The end result is a great smoky flavor, along with an exterior of crispy bacon, and an interior of super tender pork, melted cheese, and great vegetables. It was surprising, to say the least, how great this was. I had it as a sandwich the following day, and don’t even get me started on that one! If you are looking for a new item to put on your smoker, and one that will serve many, give this one a shot. Hope you enjoy!

Bacon Wrapped Fatty
Author: 
Recipe type: Barbecue
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 12
 
Ingredients
  • 16 slices of bacon
  • 2 lbs Italian sausage, or ground pork
  • 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and diced
  • 3 small cremini mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 4 basil leaves, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1½ cups of shredded mozzarella cheese
  • pizza sauce
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • wax paper
  • gallon size sealable bag
  • smoker
Instructions
  1. Start by making your bacon weave. I will not go over those details, but it only takes a few minutes. There are many online instructions how to make one. One resource is this one, on YouTube.
  2. Once the bacon weave is made, lay it on a large sheet of wax paper. Next add the Italian sausage to a sealable plastic bag, and with a rolling pin, gently roll the sausage back and forth and side to side to level it out.
  3. Once the pork is nice and even, using a scissors, cut along side the edges of the bag. Carefully flip it over and onto the second piece of wax paper.
  4. Add the mushrooms, garlic, onion, cheese, and jalapenos to the top, center of the flattened sausage. Carefully start rolling the pork mixture into a log using the wax paper as your guide. Once you have it in log form, using your hands, seal up the edges, then add the log onto the top of the bacon.
  5. Repeat the process with the bacon. Now you have a bacon and pork log!
  6. Place this onto your smoker. It’s going to smoke for a few hours. I smoked it on low for about 3 hours, then finished in the oven after lathering some pizza sauce onto it. You want the internal temperature of the pork to be about 165.
  7. When you are ready to serve, slice into rounds, and serve with any of your favorite sides.

 

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Spatchcock Smoked Turkey

This past Thanksgiving, I debated whether or not to smoke a turkey, and well, the debate led me to go ahead and go through with it. It wasn’t much of a debate to be quiet honest with you as I love smoking all sorts of food. But time around instead of smoking a whole bird, I decided to spatchcock it. Spatchcock you ask? Well don’t say that word around high school students in your house because they will get a good laugh out of it. If you have never spatchcocked a chicken or turkey, I say it is a real must. The great thing about spatchcocking (removing the backbone) is a much quicker cooking time that always yields tender and juicy meat.

Spatchcock Smoked Turkey

A goal of smoking any large turkey or chicken, at least in my opinion, is to do a quick brine. To brine, boil one liter of water along with 3/4 cup of salt, a couple of cloves of smashed garlic, any citrus, some black peppercorns, and fresh herbs. Once boiled, add about 4 cups of ice to it and let it completely cool. Once cooled, it is then time to submerge your turkey, and let it submerge for 2-3 hours. Once brined, removed it and pat it dry.

Let’s get started.

  • 10-11 pound turkey
  • your favorite wood for smoking, I used cherry chunks
  • Coal
  • Poultry shears
  • salt and pepper
  • butter, optional

Place the turkey breast side down on your work surface, and with your poultry shears, cut along each side of the backbone. I find it easiest to start near the tail end of the bird and work your way up. This can take a bit of muscle, but it is well worth it. Once the backbone is removed, you can save it for stock if you want, hold each side of the turkey and open it up. Trim any excess fat if you want, then turn the turkey breast side up.

Using your palm, press down firmly on the breast bone to snap it. Repeat on the other breast bone. Now place this in your brining solution for at least 2-3 hours. Once brined, remove and pat dry.

How to smoke a turkey

Season with any salt and pepper, and rub any butter under the skin if you desire, then go prepare your smoker. I smoked mine on low, 225 degrees until your internal temperate in two different spots reaches 165 degrees.

Once cooked, remove, let it rest for about 15 minutes, then slice in.

The exterior has this awesome color unlike anything you get when roasted, and the cherry wood smoked meat is super moist and delicious. I will be spatchcocking on a regular basis now, and making this an annual tradition as well. Give this a shot next time your smoke a turkey or chicken, or heck even roast it. Hope you enjoy!

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Spicy Thai Dipping Sauce – Nam Jim Jaew

I am a huge fan of Thai dipping sauces. Not only Thai but also Vietnamese. There is something about the perfect balance of sweet, sour, and spice that when served with sticky rice or grilled meat, well, let’s just say it is a game changer. I’ve made some pretty darn good sauces in the past such as the Thai shallot sauce, the Thai Three Sauce, or the classic Thai dipping sauce, but this sauce in particular really stands out. It’s known as nam jim jaew and what separates it is the additions of toasted rice and spring onions.

Nam Jim Jaew with Grilled Beef

Let’s get started.

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp fish sauce (I use Red Boat)
  • 2 tbsp pomegranate syrup, or preferably tamarind pulp
  • 1 tbsp ground red chili
  • 1/2 tbsp palm sugar
  • 2 tsp toasted rice
  • 2 tbsp spring onion, thinly sliced

Now typically you would use tamarind pulp for this recipe, however I was out and decided to use pomegranate syrup as it yields the same texture and sourness to the dish. Did I mention it was just as awesome? Regardless, add everything to a small mixing bowl, and with the back of a fork, mix everything together, ensuring that the palm sugar thins out.

How to make Nam Jim Jaew

Add the sauce into a small serving dish and serve alongside any grilled meat. This stuff is addicting. I was actually eating it by the spoon, and I’m not kidding about that. I probably used about 5 different spoons as it was hard to hold back. When paired with the grilled beef, well, you are just going to fall in love. Hope you enjoy!

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