The Potsticker

Pot Sticker - GyozaI realize that most of my ingredients and flavors are surround by Asian cultures, and there is a reason for that. The freshness of the ingredient, the intense flavors, and the simplicity of the cook time. Today I am focusing on the pot sticker, otherwise know as the gyoza. I have been making these for many years and they truly are delicious. The process contains meat marination, wrapping, and cooking these little morsels, similar to the egg roll process. I was turned onto these dumplings while eating Dim Sum, and figured out my own pot sticker from that point on.
Ingredients:

  • Ground Pork
  • Shallots or green onions, thinly sliced/chopped
  • Roasted Sesame Oil (dark)
  • Sherry Cooking Wine
  • Pepper
  • Chinese Cabbage (Savoy)
  • Chopped Ginger
  • Water for wrapping
  • Chicken broth or water for steaming
  • Small amount of oil (vegetable or canola)
  • Gyoza Wrappers (found in many Asian markets)

For the non-meat eater, please note that you can substitute meat for vegetables as well.

Pot Sticker - GyozaOnce you have the meat mixture marinated with above ingredients, excluding the wrappers, let it marinade for nearly thirty minutes to a hour. Once ready, place about a tablespoon of the meat mixture into the middle of the wrapper, and be mindful that you want to make a tight seal of the wrapper, so do not get too close to the edges. Brush water along the half-side of the moon-shaped wrapper, fold over and seal. Move onto the next twenty or fifty.

Once you are ready, heat a large pan of about one tablespoon of the oil and disperse throughout the pan. The goal is to lightly coat the pan with oil as we want to go through a light fry process on both sides, amounting to about 2-3 minutes on each side. Once lightly browned on each side, add your water or chicken broth, about a 1/4 to a 1/2 cup, cover, and let steam until the liquid almost evaporates.

Pot Sticker - GyozaThat’s it. Plate and serve. You can do a few things with these at this time. Add them to a broth, a few glass noodles, and serve as a soup, or my favorite which is dipping them into the gyoza sauce, or a chili sauce, or heck, simply eat them alone as the flavor itself is so good.

If are are wanting to make the sauce, it is really easy:

  • 1/3 cup of soy sauce
  • 1/4 of rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon of sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon of Srirachi hot sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon of sugar
  • Garlic or ginger is optional


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